Friday, March 20, 2015

Long awaited. Andrew Rippeon, from PORCHES (Delete Press 2015):

Andrew Rippeon edited P-Queue (2007 – 2010), founded QUEUE Books (2007 – 2011), and now works as a letterpress printer and serves as the studio manager for The Press at Nine-Mile Swamp. He is editing a selection of letters from Larry Eigner to Jonathan Williams, of The Jargon Society, and currently teaches literature at Hamilton College in central New York.

Tuesday, March 17, 2015

An unusual but potentially useful source of poetry information, At Buffalo, mag for SUNY-Buffalo alumni — i.e. Lauren Newkirk Maynard, "Priceless Cargo: UB Sends Rare Manuscripts to Wales to Honor 100th Birthday of Dylan Thomas" (Winter 2015):

And this anecdote from the same issue on Charles Olson's Myth and Lit course at Buffalo, c1964:

Monday, March 16, 2015

Lee Si-Young, "The Police Did Not Think of Them as Human Beings." Patterns. Trans. Brother Anthony and Yoo Hui-Sok. Green Integer 2014.
The police thought of them as enemies. At 5:30 a.m. on the 20th, all five lanes of Han'gang Street were closed to traffic. 1600 men from 20 squadrons of police were deployed, together with 49 men from the Seoul anti-terrorist special brigade and four water-trucks. From the start, the police did not consider the dispossessed renters as human beings. Likewise, the fifty or so protesters, who were occupying a watch-tower they had constructed using containers etc. on the roof of the 5-floor commercial building scheduled for demolition in the redevelopment of Han'gang Street's 2nd block, did not think of the police as human beings. Instead, they had stocks of firebombs, acid bombs and 60 cans of paint-thinner up on the roof as a means of defense. As soon as the police tried to storm the ground floor of the building at 6:05, they hurled firebombs. At 6:10 the water-trucks aimed powerful jets at the roof of the building. The police seemed to be thinking of the citizens, now soaked with water like drowned rats, as major criminals or terrorists. At 6:45, 13 members of the police special brigade arrived on the roof, carried in a container raised by a crane. The container struck the watchtower hard and the firebombs thrown by the squatters drove back the water cannon. At 7:10 fire first broke out in the watch-tower. At 7:20 ten additional members of the special brigade arrived on the roof. At 7:26 the police stormed the first level of the tower, the protesters retreated to the upper level, resisting fiercely, as red flames began to emerge from the interior, then after a strong explosion the entire structure was engulfed in the blaze. By this time, the roof was ankle-deep in water from the cannons, with a layer of thinner floating on its surface. Just then three or four squatters rushed out of the flames and were hanging from the railings round the roof, away from the smoke, shouting, "Help!" but nobody took any notice. Finally, they fell to the icy ground where no mattresses had been spread. The day's attack ended with six blackened corpses left lying in the tower, including one policeman, but from the start the police had not thought of the protesters as human beings and the protesters did not consider them as their policemen. 

Sunday, March 15, 2015

Lisa Jeschke and Lucy Benyon, David Cameron: A Theatre of Knife-Songs (Shit Valley 2015).

"Song Seven" (David Cameron): "The tables are turning and dancing on their heads. Everything everyone break open faces split up laugh suns fire fire arses expel shit mouths speak. Everything and everyone that went in to be concealed beneath a surface come out not as ghosts but as fleshly fucking human flesh."
"Song Seven" (David Cameron): "Objects, show your intestines! Shake, dead international waiting staff! Flesh and blood appear every thing matter matter matter full-on mutilated bodies in head-storm matter. Ground, unearth the dead died. Faces, explain your surfaces, explain the labour of your mum and the historical dust that went into your bloodied body brain." 
Untitled (David Cameron):
                    I am a toxic whore
                    I murdered Jack the Ripper. 

Thursday, March 12, 2015

From "The Western Exclusion of Islam," The Malady of Wisdom (17th Installment), Abdelwahab Meddeb (Trans. Pierre Joris and Charlotte Mandell):
It is the exercise of injustice in impunity that feeds hatred and horrifying terrorism, which remains the weapon of the impoverished, the weak, those who have exhausted the resources of the law.
Tom Allen, "On Lisa Jeschke's Manning" (Hi Zero 31):
A consciousness formed from the same blood and fire as that which it would overcome will inevitably risk falling into the same modes of judgement and duration that hold the world as it is.   
And the larger passage this comes from:
Law needs a future. It must generate objects that correspond to it. These objects mark the limit of each new statute, and do so to the extent that the marking of this limit is inseparable from their existence. Such things must remain unchanged as they progress through time; boundary stones are useless if they erode. The legalistic repetition that this ensues, in and outside prison, is, for some, the very definition of myth and therefore of domination. This myth, and the violence that is sedimented within it, is ingrained in the subject's capacity for experience. This ontology poses a question for a poetry that seeks to undo domination. This question, as I feel it, concerns how a subject is to relate to an object of legal violence in a manner that does not repeat that which produced it. A consciousness formed from the same blood and fire as that which it would overcome will inevitably risk falling into the same modes of judgement and duration that hold the world as it is.   
Passage from same re pain:
Under hopelessly complex social conditions the knowledge of the irrefutable presence of pain is knowledge of the truth of these conditions. 
Same (Allen) re value and the name (qts fr Grundrisse):
For the Marx of The Grundrisse, this same relation between quality and the name was a feature of the ontology of money. As pure circulating value, cash is pure liquid and is free to form the external referent of any and every thing. It is the baptism-bowl of commodity society: "Money is in the first instance that expresses the relation of equality between all exchange values: in money they all have the same name." What is realized in the sale of the commodity is not the name of the object, is not anything that could potentially bring its essence into fulfillment, but rather it is the brute fact of its instrumentation under capitalism. Objects in exchange, as they express their existence in and through others, are realised only as exchanged: "What money circulates is not commodities but their titles of ownership; and what is realized in the opposite direction in this circulation, whether by purchase or sale, is again not the commodities, but their prices." The context through which commodities express their value and through which they contain their other is a false universal. The whole, here, betrays its own objects as it realises them. The circulated object is commensurate with the prisoner. Both move through and against the name that realises them in and through the structures of their domination. 

Friday, February 20, 2015

Artists, teachers, writers, scientists, all of us who crawl in the dirt,
we must form militant unions and assert the power
of our labor. Who the fuck knows what kind of sunrise
awaits the fantasized nostalgia for a bourgeois security
that never was. Who the fuck really ought to fuck off
when we are proletarianized, telling us that we are but
the vampiric bourgeoisie, stealing from workers their
very resistance to us. True, the bourgeoisie wants
everything everyone else has. But our responsibility is
not to not want everything not not, but not annihilate
the stomach rummaged in alien corncakes not not
it is our responsibility to use our privilege even
in our despair, born there to fair life give me your hand
and let's destroy our enemies and love each other and
have everything by rigorous life struggling blessed future.

JOSH STANLEY | FROM A STORY | DEFECTOR (CAMBRIDGE 2014)



Monday, December 01, 2014

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